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Mind-Boggling 15,000Km and 7680 Hours Tennis Training

How Lleyton Hewitt's unprecedented 20th straight Australian Open tilt this month will be the culmination of a brutal summer regime involving some 800km of high-intensity hitting, running, swimming, boxing and strength tennis training.

Long revered as one of Australia's most supreme athletes, Hewitt has worked ferociously on his game and fitness for almost six hours a day, six days a week - virtually non-stop - since early November in preparation for his Open swan song.

Attacking every session as if it were his last, the indefatigable former world No.1 has worn out a queue of hitting partners since commencing his exhausting eight-week block and left his decade-long conditioner in awe.

"In terms of endurance and durability playing professional sport at the highest level for 20 years, there wouldn't be many athletes who could match it with Lleyton for intensity on a day-to-day basis," fitness trainer Nathan Martin told AAP.

"He never gets sore. He turns up every day with the same...

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Professional Player's Tennis Training Diary

   

Watching their favorite professionals claim big wins on the world's most famous courts is inspirational for many club level players but it is the hard work behind the scenes that might provide the most powerful lesson. Giselle Martin, fitness trainer to Casey Dellacqua shares her tennis training diary from Birmingham to show how hard the professionals work at their preparation.

Early Challenges
The grass court season officially begins for Casey Dellacqua in Birmingham. With a big day in both singles and doubles, we are up at 7 am, have breakfast at 8 am and are ready for our scheduled pick up at 9 am.

And this is where we face one of our first challenges of the short grass court swing. In England, the rules won’t allow you to hit before 10 am, which means we need to be extremely organised to ensure everything runs smoothly. Accordingly, we squeeze in a warm-up in the gym, including some shoulder rehab exercises, at 9.30 am.

With grass court time so limited, there...

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Coach Is Boss

Its true, well a tennis coach should be the boss. However it seems there is a trend that has been developing for a while.... Parents, players and other influences who apparently know better are controlling what happens, on and off the court. In my opinion it is wrong. I can see the problem here coming from two areas.

1. The coach is not strong enough with their players and their support team or they run their business just for profits, not results or the benefit of players and the game (they don't care as they should) so they are happy to let things be.

2. Influences around the player stepping over the boundary and giving bad advice, undermining the players team and chopping and changing things around, which is confusing and causes instability for players.

As a tennis fitness trainer, I know my role and responsibility. When I deal with Tony Roche I ask him what he needs and what I can do. Then he leaves it with me and thats that, if things need to change we communicate it and move...

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