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How to Train for Tennis Power – Part 2

Let’s recap on Train for Tennis Power Part 1.

We have found the most successful ways to train athletes, is to implement EFFECTIVE PROGRESSIONS.

With every program we design, we ask the all-important questions;

“Why are we doing this exercise and what are we trying to achieve”

In Train for Tennis Power Part 1, we talked about the common problems we have found players doing when training for tennis power. Now we are going to give you a solution for these problems. (If you didn’t read Train for Tennis Power Part 1 Click Here)

To get it right you need to consider a few important steps -

Step 1 - Build strength
Firstly, one of the biggest mistakes is not having a good strength foundation. Focus on building strength through the major muscles groups prior to performing any power orientated exercises. This is especially important for young athletes. If a young player cannot squat under body weight, how can you expect them to do anything dynamically with good form!...

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How to Train for Tennis Power – Part 1

At Tennis Fitness, we have found the most successful ways to train athletes for tennis power, is to implement EFFECTIVE PROGRESSIONS.

With every program we design, we ask the all-important questions;

“Why are we doing this tennis exercise and what are we trying to achieve”

Over the years we have seen so many players, not training correctly for power gains (force production) they are wasting their time and the programs aren’t working for them as they haven’t been able to progress their exercises, sets and repetitions effectively.

Here are some common problems we have found;

1. Immediate Results - Players want immediate power results and don’t take the time to build a good strength foundation that will dramatically help with their power output. You cannot expect to generate a faster powerful serve, if you don’t have a solid strength foundation.

2. Correct Technique - Players start with force expression (jumping) exercises without learning how to...

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Modern Day Tennis Strength Training

You have probably heard us go on about how important is tennis strength training. If you haven’t, well we consider it to be the building block for all other training modalities.

It’s the foundation for physical development! That’s why we are so excited to be able to share with you our new approach to how we program our tennis players for strength gains.

We have developed a system and structure that progresses and periodise our strength programs, it is practical, effective and tennis specific.

If you are one of the players who goes to gym and does “Whatever” you will get whatever results… who wants that!

You need to know what you are doing, make sure your tennis program is progressing and most importantly, know WHY you are doing it! It’s all about the why!

If you can’t answer the reason why you’re doing it and have any purpose or intention with your program, then it’s not going to work.

We are so passionate about strength...

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Specific Tennis Exercises for the Dirt

The best way to prepare for any surface is to do tennis training on it as much as possible. This is the law of adaptation and it especially applies for clay court tennis. On this surface, you need to learn how to slide into shots, recover after hitting and stay balanced. When you are born in a country where the main surface you train and compete on is clay, it just become natural to move efficiently, you don’t even realise it happens. You are able to start sliding when you build up that confidence. The other requirements are good balance, a low centre of gravity and most importantly, strength in your legs. For better balance and control, it’s critical to have a good low stance, keeping yourself balanced and being aware of the first step movement.

  • You need to slide and hit – not hit and slide.
  • For good body control, you need to have good strength in the core, hips and especially in the adductors.
  • You need good timing, which comes with practice.
  • For stability, you...
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Discover a Secret Tennis Training Technique For Recovery

Sometimes we have to go back and look at natural remedies that our parents and grandparents used and be given a reminder as to why they worked and why they used them. I think Epsom salt is a good example, inexpensive and has some amazing benefits. Epsom salt bath is best tennis training technique for recovery.

Epsom salt is a mineral compound comprised of magnesium and sulfate. It has been used for many many years as a natural remedy. Both magnesium and sulfate are minerals that are very important to tennis players. After strenuous tennis exercise, through your sweat Tennis players will lose essential electrolytes. (Especially magnesium and sulphate). One of the best ways to replenish the body of these essential minerals is through are largest organ, our skin. When Epsom salt is dissolved in warm water it is absorbed through the skin and can naturally replenish lost magnesium and sulphate. This will help increase your energy levels.

If you want to get tennis results from all your...

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Tennis Training Volume – What is the Right Amount?

In order to improve your tennis performance it is important to physically work hard, but it is just as important to rest and recover hard! Vigorous, prolonged tennis exercise breaks down muscle tissue, fatigues the nervous system and overall places the body under stress. It is during the rest and recovery period that the body gets the positive physical and emotional gains (cardio vascular, strength, mentally etc.).

If there is an overload of tennis training volume and intensity (level of energy used) with inadequate recovery time between sessions, a player will start to develop, physical, behavioural and emotional issues. This scenario can be classified as a condition called Overtraining. Overtraining or burnout is a common problem for many athletes of all ages in many sports. It is often seen in young tennis players. Possibly due to the fact that they find it harder to communicate how they are feeling and they are not as in tune with their bodies as adults.

Working with the right...

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