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Is Tennis a Good Workout?

How to stay healthy and enjoy playing tennis for life. 

One thing that I love about tennis, is that it brings people together, it is a game for life.  Studies have shown, that people who play tennis live longer, so why would you ever quit?  People quit when the game is no longer fun.  Suffering from an injury is not fun!  I have had the privilege of working with the Rogers Cup WTA tour over the past twenty years. By far the most common reason that the pros retire from the tour is the emotional fatigue that comes from dealing with injury after injury. It’s not just the pros that are plagued by injury, just look around the courts and notice how many people have a strap on their elbow, or compression sleeve on their knee or ankle.  So why are injuries so common in tennis?

 

Two types of common tennis injury:

First of all, there are two types of tennis injuries, acute and chronic.  An example of an acute injury is when you fall on the court...

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Tennis Wrist Injuries

 

A tennis wrist injuries have forced has forced me to miss tennis since November 2019. The recovery is slow, possibly another couple of months (6-18months typically), and has required initial rest followed by physiotherapy and a structured rehab program.

The wrist injury was most likely caused by a change in technique combined with an increased workload on the tennis court and… sadly age. I never really dedicated much time to the gym to strengthen my wrists specifically for tennis. I sure am now!

Many pro players including Del Potro, Nishikori, Nadal & Kuznetsova have had time off the tour in recent years due to wrist injuries and even gone under the knife. Nadal missed most of 2016 due to a persistent wrist problem.

Many wrist injuries result from aggressive modern grip types. The semi-western and western forehand grips are associated with injuries to the ulnar (little finger) side of the wrist.

This includes the highly problematic dislocations and degeneration...

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7 Core Principles to Improve Tennis Footwork and Court Movement

As a tennis fitness coach or trainer, it is important to be constantly learning and growing, without this approach, not much will change. We call this the “Growth mindset”. We strongly encourage everyone to have a growth mindset. We know as Tennis Fitness Coaches we need to be constantly looking for ways to benefit our players, this means being open, willing to try new things, and being creative in what we do.

The past 6 months has seen some changes for us. One of the changes involved developing a structure that gave us clear guidelines on Tennis Footwork and Court Movement. We called this our “7 Tennis Movement Principles”

We did this to give us a clear definition of what we teach our athletes. We have found it has given athletes more confidence in what they are doing and helps educate them on the importance of breaking down movement and focusing on weaker movement patterns.

To keep it simple, we highlighted 7 areas that affect overall movement...

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Tennis Speed, Agility & Power Exercises

The one word that changes everything – ‘WHY’

If you want maximum gains, if you want to be the best you can be, if you want to know a little secret – Keep reading.

We learned years ago that doing fancy exercises and training really hard didn’t always get the best results unless you know why you are doing them.

Training effectively always comes down to purpose.  Knowing - Why am I doing this training block, why am I doing this exercise, why do this amount of reps, etc. What is the purpose of your training regime, your exercises, and the variables around them?

These are the questions you need to ask yourself all the time. It is especially important for coaches and trainers to know the “why” in what they do.

I trained Lleyton Hewitt for 8 preseasons in a row and although Lleyton was never the guy to ask, “why are we doing this” or “why has this changed”. We would speak about the benefits of the training phase we...

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Check Out What The Tennis Pros Are Doing?

I have been guilty in the past of being up and down with my training and I'm a tennis trainer! So I know how hard it can be. Staying disciplined and focused is tough, but it is what it takes for players to be tennis pros.

What is important is to keep changing what you do, progressing your tennis program, continually challenging yourself.

This not only adds variety, but it is needed to allow your body to continually adapt and improve.

When done correctly it adds serious physical progress, who doesn’t want that!

I’ve admitted I’ve been slack a few times with my tennis fitness training, I’m human, I really had no excuse.

I know what to do and when to do it, on the rare occasion I’ve slipped it’s been a case of I’m too busy, no excuse. Others on the other hand, maybe even you have an excuse – You don’t know what to do and when to do it.

Maybe you think you do, but is it really working for you? I hope so!

Over the last couple of...

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Training For Tennis - Peak For My Next Tournament?

How important it is to periodize your training for tennis?
Periodization is simply, structuring on and off-court tennis training into phases or blocks of time.

The basic phases include:
• Preparation (general and specific)
• Competition (pre-competition and competition)
• Transition (offseason)

Each phase focuses on different aspects of tennis fitness and tennis conditioning (cardio endurance, strength, power, tennis speed, agility, and recuperation) in conjunction with on-court work, specifically for the phase.

Here is a brief explanation of each phase.

Preparation (General and Specific)

General: High training volume/ low intensity. The focus is on tennis endurance and strength. Training can be general and non-tennis specific at the start of the phase (cross-training) a good time to work on tennis technique. Ratio 30:70.on court : off-court training Phase length: 4-6 weeks.

Specific: Low volume/High intensity. Focus on more specific tennis training ...

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Nadal Exposed!!! Ways to Increase Your Tennis Power on Court

Power is one of the most important aspects of being a successful tennis player. At any level being able to continuously, move dynamically for extended periods of time will ultimately lead to good results. Nadal is a classic example of this, he manages to maintain his power and dynamic movements over hours of tennis. Tennis is a power endurance sport. This means you need to be able to jump, dynamically change direction and positions, rotate with speed, and accelerate the arm through a range of motion. All this happens naturally for most players, however, there are many ways to improve certain aspects of your tennis power, which will lead to better court movement, more control, and better intensity at the end of matches and practice.

Give this specific tennis power endurance program a go for 1 month (twice a week) and I am sure you will feel the difference. The aim is to do these tennis exercises at 100% intensity with good posture and form, so work at your level. Always remember...

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