Blog

Specific Tennis Exercises for the Dirt

The best way to prepare for any surface is to do tennis training on it as much as possible. This is the law of adaptation and it especially applies for clay court tennis. On this surface, you need to learn how to slide into shots, recover after hitting and stay balanced. When you are born in a country where the main surface you train and compete on is clay, it just become natural to move efficiently, you don’t even realise it happens. You are able to start sliding when you build up that confidence. The other requirements are good balance, a low centre of gravity and most importantly, strength in your legs. For better balance and control, it’s critical to have a good low stance, keeping yourself balanced and being aware of the first step movement.

  • You need to slide and hit – not hit and slide.
  • For good body control, you need to have good strength in the core, hips and especially in the adductors.
  • You need good timing, which comes with practice.
  • For stability, you...
Continue Reading...

How Should Tennis Training Differ From Surface to Surface?

Just as court surfaces differ throughout the world, there are different courts that you might encounter as a social player. Altering your tennis training according to the surface you’re currently or preparing to play on, is a smart way to train for tennis. This will get your body better prepared and lessen the chance of injury. So how should training for tennis differ from surface to surface? To understand this better let's take a look at some key characteristics of varying court surfaces. Synthetic grass

  • Low ball bounce, fast court, poor traction underfoot.
  • Average point = 3–5 seconds.

Clay

  • High ball bounce, slow court, poor traction underfoot.
  • Average point = 6–10 seconds.

Hardcourt

  • Medium ball bounce, moderate-fast court, good traction underfoot.
  • Average point = 4–6 seconds.

Grass

  • Low ball bounce, fast court, Moderate traction underfoot.
  • Average point = 3–5 seconds.

Here are our tips on preparing for each surface. Grass/Synthetic grass

  • Due...
Continue Reading...

Benefits Of Adding Variety in Tennis Training

When it comes to tennis exercise and preparing your body to play your best tennis, it is important to do the right things at the right time. That includes resting and changing what you do, even if you feel your current routine works. Tennis training variety is often overlooked.

Some people prefer consistency, so do the same things all the time then often wonder why they are not improving. Others jump from tennis program to another without allowing the body time to adapt.

Whatever your "training personality", it is vital for long-term development (at any age) and performance to phase the tennis training you do. Often known as periodisation, phase training is as important as your actual tennis exercises. This is how it works ...

PREPARATION

General: High training volume and low intensity. Focus is on endurance and strength. Your tennis training can be general and non-tennis specific at the start (cross-training). This is a good time to work on tennis training techniques. 

...

Continue Reading...

Don’t Let Travel Affect Your Tennis Fitness Training

Tennis is a year-round sport with tournaments played globally and often in hot conditions. Travelling on tour can be brutal for players, as there are many different factors that need to be considered along with a focus on tennis fitness. They range from changing time zones, managing jet lag, coping with new cuisine to cultural and language barriers. To ensure health and fitness are not compromised, it's important to be prepared and keep going on with your tennis fitness schedule.

Adopting these simple but effective measures can help improve a travel experience...

Planning

Make the Internet your best friend before travelling. Do well research prior to arriving at destinations to learn the location of grocery shops, health food stores, restaurants, gymnasiums, and pools. Organize a schedule, which includes training and meal plans, before departing to ensure your routine is maintained on the road. It is still important to be flexible and not to expect anything when you travel, however...

Continue Reading...

Strategy For Best Tennis Fitness Plan

There are few players who step on the court without a match plan in mind. To make the most of your training time, that same structured thinking should reply to your fitness too. The best fitness strategy is a balanced one. Getting balance into your tennis fitness plan will improve your performance, help keep you injury free and give you the variety you need to stay motivated. Here is a rundown on how to do it.

Build
Build up your fitness by completing a variety of tennis training. This will ideally incorporate:

• Cross training
• Strength training
• Cardio
• Agility
• Speed
• Core

It is always best to attack your weakest link first. Fitness testing is the best way to find out what requires the most attention. Many people do very little to improve their tennis fitness, they think hitting more is the key, which is far from true. If you are...

Continue Reading...

Fitness Testing for Tennis

When we talk about tennis training milestones, tennis fitness testing helps in finding out what physical milestones are important for each tennis player and what milestones are going to motivate them the most. Everyone has different goals, strengths and weaknesses. Working towards something that you would consider a milestone is what it is all about, that’s how you keep yourself moving forward and motivated. Things like finishing off a three-set match feeling strong, getting to balls you never dreamt of, hitting the ball with more power and control, remaining injury free for the calendar year, playing 10 tournaments in a row etc. the list could go on and on. Set some targets and put a plan in place to achieve them.

Here are some tennis exercises to help you improve your physical condition and get you one step closer to reaching your milestones. They will get you stronger, quicker and more powerful, most importantly you can do them, again and again, to see how much you have...

Continue Reading...

Lessons From Lleyton Hewitt

What can you learn from Lleyton Hewitt, who will play a record-breaking 20th and final Australian Open this summer?

Lleyton Hewitt is the ultimate professional when it comes to tennis training. A professional athlete needs the following categories to be considered the "whole package” – great physical attributes, punctuality, strong organisational skills, focus, intensity and commitment.

Having worked with Lleyton for the past 10 years, he scores close to 10 out of 10 for all of them. He is never late, always has everything he needs, knows what he is doing and is determined to get it done. He always has an extremely high level of intensity and can back it up day after day.

Lleyton attacks his pre-season with the enthusiasm of a 20-year-old year after year. As a tennis fitness trainer, you can’t ask for more. A typical pre-season tennis training block for Lleyton runs for 10 to 12 weeks, training between three and five hours a day. During the initial transition...

Continue Reading...

Importance of Staying Balanced in Tennis

Staying balanced is important for constant development and improvement in tennis. If you have ever felt flat or stagnant with your tennis training, then there is a good chance your balance has been out.

When we talk about having balance we are talking about having a consistent flow or steady energy throughout your day and week. Waking up every day ready to go, feeling motivated, uninjured and good about yourself.

So how do you know if you are balanced?

Answer these questions:
• Do you often feel flat and tired?
• Do you often feel unmotivated?
• Do you always feel like you are carrying an injury?
• Is your tennis improving?
• Are you getting fitter and stronger?

If you answered yes to more than one of these questions there is a good chance you may need to make some minor adjustments

REGAIN YOUR BALANCE

Getting balanced involves increasing your focus on areas of weakness, or where you spend less time and decreasing your focus on the areas you spend...

Continue Reading...

Equipment For Tennis Fitness Training

Having useful equipment for tennis at hand is important for any player who is committed to tennis training and competing at an optimal level. Many professionals travel with their own training and recovery equipment. Not only do they realize the benefits of various pieces of equipment, but they also understand that those fitness accessories aren’t always available on the road.

Let’s look at some equipment that is commonly used by tennis players.

Resistance Bands
These bands, comprising rubber tubing with handles attached, are one of our favorite pieces of equipment – we recommend that every player has a set.

Weighing around 800 grams, resistance bands are used for strength training and can be used instead of dumbbells. Adding to the appeal is the fact that resistance bands are lightweight and extremely versatile.

You can also add a waist belt attachment for tennis speed and agility work. We highly recommend checking them out – and to assist in that...

Continue Reading...

How To Prepare For A Tennis Tournament?

I am often amazed how little people know about tournament preparation. Preparing for tournaments is one of the most critical things to get right and finding what works best for you or your players as individuals, is important.

I know some people will be reading this and be saying to themselves "My preparation is, to not prepare“ I’m better off just turning up and playing, that works best for me” Sorry guys that’s the lazy mans approach, and there is a good chance if you follow it, you won’t get far as a tennis player.

There are certain principles that need to be applied in order to get the most out of yourself come match day, here are some key principles;

1. Hydration - keeping yourself hydrated is important for concentration, energy levels and preventing tennis injuries. As a guide athletes can follow this formula; 0.03 x Body weight (KG) = ? Litres of water. This is a base requirement. Depending on weather conditions and how much you sweat Add...

Continue Reading...
Close

50% Complete

Two Step

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.